Category Archives: Tool Reviews

Reviews of tools both new and old

Feast or Famine….

This past Thursday and Friday I made my bi-annual pilgrimage to the ‘Live Free or Die’ Tool Show and Auction in Nashua, NH.

Old dovetailed tool chest full of molding planes
Old dovetailed tool chest full of molding planes

I always enjoy hunting for whatever oddball tool I have on my wish list or whatever new treasure I didn’t know I couldn’t live without until I discover it.

Small cooper's plane with nice bentwood folding legs
Small cooper’s plane with nice bentwood folding legs

Beyond my own tool shopping its good to see old friends and familiar faces at the show.

Carpenter's Chest with reinforced edges made from sheet tin.
Carpenter’s Chest with reinforced edges made from sheet tin.

Some years you’ll see tons of a given type of item, other years that same item might be real hard to come by. This year hand drills and Stanley 45s and 55s seemed to be plentiful.

Nest of drawers, survey equipment, knives etc
Nest of drawers, survey equipment, knives etc

Tool chests on the other hand were not in season it seems. So I grabbed a few snapshots of what I saw this time out, but nothing overly notable.

Millers Falls Drills (2 #2, 1 #3), Rabbet Plane with chip-breaker, Shear Cut File, Marples Paring Chisel, Ulmia Moving Fillister Plane, Tite-Mark, Starrett Depth Gauge, Spoke Shave, Starrett Large Dividers, Miller's Falls Large Dividers, Astragal Plane
Millers Falls Drills (2 #2, 1 #3), Rabbet Plane with chip-breaker, Shear Cut File, Marples Paring Chisel, Ulmia Moving Fillister Plane, Tite-Mark, Starrett Depth Gauge, Spoke Shave, Starrett Large Dividers, Miller’s Falls Large Dividers, Astragal Plane

Some years I come home with a ton of stuff from my mental list and some times I don’t get much but I still come home with some finds. This time out I got some great deals and found several items I’d been hunting for, for a long time. I found a nice LARGE Starrett No. 85 dividers which are great for laying out staircases and other large scale projects. I also got a deal I could not pass up on another Tite-Mark, an Ulmia Moving Fillister plane and a nice old Starrett depth gauge with a real nice micro adjustment knob. Since the last show I seem to be really into Miller’s falls double gear hand drills — which I first learned about from my friend Tom Fidgen. Last year I picked up a #5 that I now use all the time. This time I got 2 real nice #2s an a nice #3 for the shop.

1938 Starrett Catalog, Old EAIA Pamphlet on Timber Framing for Old Bethpage Village, Atha Tool Compay Reprint, Book of Old Virginia Furniture Plans
1938 Starrett Catalog, Old EAIA Pamphlet on Timber Framing for Old Bethpage Village, Atha Tool Company Reprint, Book of Old Virginia Furniture Plans

I also found some nice old tool catalogs including a 1938 Starrett Catalog, a reprint of an 1883 Atha Tool Company Catalog, and a book from the 1950s on old Virginia furniture with great shop drawings inside. My favorite find which was given to me for free is an old EAIA Pamphlet from 1971 that was put together for Old Bethpage Village in NY (which I remember going to in grade school) called ‘Of Plates and Purlins — Grandpa builds a Barn’ This great little pamphlet has a very Eric Sloane-esque feel to it and walks through the basics of building a dutch barn.

Cant Hook for rolling logs
Cant Hook for rolling logs

And last but not least was as real nice forged cant hook from Maine. In the coming weeks I need to clear some land out in the yard for a forthcoming timber framed barn/shed so I am sure it will get some good use.

Now it’s time to get out to the workshop, try out the new toys and start and start saving for the next show in April….

Take care,
-Bill

The Tool Store at the Woodwright’s School

The Woodwright’s School is already hallowed ground for a lot of woodworkers, but hovering above workshop is Ed Lebetkin’s Antique Tool store….

Up the stairs and take a right at the large model plane
Up the stairs and take a right at the large model plane

Before heading up there, I was warned to leave my wallet behind as there would be a lot of temptation at the top of the stairs….Ed’s store is filled with just about every kind of traditional woodworking tool and accessory you could want.

Wide angle view of Ed's Antique Tool Store
Wide angle view of Ed’s Antique Tool Store

An amazing assortment of chisels, planes of every kind, marking gauges, braces and bits.

Wall of molding planes
Wall of molding planes

One whole wall of the shop is filled with molding planes .

Chisels, mallets, auger bits etc.
Chisels, mallets, auger bits etc.

New stuff is always coming and going so you’ll want to visit often — or see about renting a space to camp out and be first to check out the new arrivals. 😉

Self-advancing Boring Machine
Self-advancing Boring Machine

During my visit I was enamored with an unusual boring machine. The castings on the tilt mechanism look similar to my old Swan boring machine but what made this machine unusual was the mechanism to advance the business end of the unit horizontally via the large knob on the bottom — rather than the whole dance of shimmying yourself and the unit up the timber and re-aligning the auger to make the next hole. The runners and support structure for it was all metal which leads me to believe it was a later design towards the end of that era.

New toys from Ed's tool shop
New toys from Ed’s tool shop

I tried my best to get out without buying anything — especially since the Nashua Live Free or Die Tool Show and Auction is coming up in a couple of weeks, but it’s like Ed knew I was coming. I found a great reprint book on Concord NH furniture makers, a book on the Shaker Barn full of tools at the Shelburne Museum in VT which I wrote about here, a MWTCA reprint of a tool catalog, a nice old Stanley auger bit extension for use with a bit brace, and a Stanley 203 bench clamp. This neat little clamp is something I’ve looked at in the past — and makes a nice addition to any bench with a sliding deadman. I look forward to giving it a try.

I’m looking forward to my next visit. If you’d like to plan a visit to the tool store or contact Ed you can find his contact info on the store’s web page here. Ed’s a great guy. If you meet him, be sure to tell him I sent you. 🙂

Take care,
-Bill

The Real Cost Of A Tool

When looking at the historic prices of tools, even after converting the dollar amounts into today’s prices it often does not give a truly accurate representation of what a tool really cost the person who bought it. I remember my first job in high school working in a retail clothing store for ~$5 an hour in 1997 which was the minimum wage in NY at the time. If I went to the store to buy something, part of that decision was always based on a calculation of ‘how many hours did I have to work to buy this item?’

Hammacher Schlemmer Sloyd Knife Ad -- The School Journal July 2, 1898
Hammacher Schlemmer Sloyd Knife Ad — The School Journal July 2, 1898

I wanted to apply this same logic to some of the tools in the 1900 Sloyd tool chest list we talked about here. I did some research and found that the average carpenter in 1899 made $2.30/day**. So that would mean the Sloyd cabinet full of tools which cost $11.91 would be about a week’s worth of wages to purchase  — 5.17 days to be exact.

Hammacher Schlemmer Sloyd Training Bench from 1898 ad in the School Journal
Hammacher Schlemmer Sloyd Training Bench from 1898 ad in the School Journal

This summer I had a chance to chat a bit with my cousin, master NYC woodworker James Cooper. (Or as he is known to the family — Jim)

Jim has been working in the craft for a long time and it was great to pick his brain a bit on this topic. I’ll recount some of my interview with him here:

“In 1971 we worked for $4/hr (although we were often wrong in estimating the time required) and the only catalog I could find from that era, 1973, is of a small German American maker of chisels and carving tools where Pattern Maker’s Chisels, 6mm – 30mm,  sold for $7.50 – $12.50 ea…….about  2 – 3hrs of labor! Today a competent mechanic in NY can earn $25/ hr and a decent 3/4″ (19mm) chisel can be had for $25 – $40 or rather less work then I exchanged 40 yrs ago. The most important point to emphasize is that whatever the cost, good to great hand tools will last a lifetime+ and, well used and cared for, will feed you for all that time, while never loosing value.

The early 20th Century Bailey 07 plane that I picked up, used but cleaned, at a flee market in 1981 for $100 (which at that time was about the cost of a new British Stanley) is worth $200+ today after my having used it for countless hours to realize 100s of projects over all that time…and it outperformed the British Stanley to boot! The $100 Bailey bought in 1981 was less then a days labor (about $125 / day at that time)!” — Jim Cooper

Taking the 3/4″ firmer gouge as an example I tried to plot it over time, and here are my findings so far:

Year Price Avg Pay Rate Time to earn it Notes
1900 $0.34 $0.23/hr 1.48 hours work $2.30/day, so assuming an 10 hour day for hourly rate at the time
1973 $10.00 $4.00/hr 2.5 Hours Assumption that during this time was potentially a low water mark for availability of quality tools in the US — all the old makers were on their way out, and new high end tools were only getting started
1981 $20.50 $12.50/hr 1.64 Hours Based on estimate of about $125/day and assuming a 10 hour day. Price of tool inflation adjusted from 1973 data point. Note also this was the time of a large global recession.
2013 $49.99 $25.00/hr 2 Hours Based on current price of a Henry Taylor 3/4″ in-cannel gouge from Traditional Woodworker which is very similar to that original gouge in the Sloyd tool chest

If any of my readers have some additional data points, I’d be happy to flesh this out more — especially before and after the world wars. So if you have an old tool catalog with prices from an earlier time (especially for a 3/4″ firmer gouge) or recall and are willing to share your pay rate at an earlier time (either hourly or daily) I would be happy to flesh this out more and see what else the data can teach us.

My conclusions based on all of this?
The availability of good quality tools, societies’ willingness to pay a craftsman a fair wage, tax codes, the macro-economic climate and the ability to find work in that field have all fluctuated over time which makes it hard to draw a lot of concrete conclusions without befriending an economist or gathering a lot more data. But having said that, I think all craftsmen and women have at one time or another done the mental calculation of current wage versus the price of that new tool and thought to themselves ‘I really need to charge a higher rate’ 😉

What to you think?  There are only so many working hours in a lifetime. Are you spending more on tools today relative to your hourly wage compared to earlier decades? Or are you coping in other ways? (Refurbishing old tools etc which still takes up a lot of time). I’m interested to hear your thoughts in the comments below.

-Bill

** I used the following source for that pay rate data —  http://www.nber.org/chapters/c2486.pdf

Live Free or Die Tool Auction and Sale

The Live Free or Die Tool Auction (and the sale out in the lot out back), also known as the ‘Nashua Tool Show’ is one of the few times a year I am happy to get up at 5am. I rarely if ever go into the actual auction; I spend all my time and money out in the parking lot tracking down odd and old tools on my list and all the things I didn’t know I needed until I found them and realized how I could not live without them. 😉  It’s a great event twice a year and well worth the trip if you are into old hand tools.

Below is a highlight reel from this weekend’s show and sale:

Workbench
Workbench

A stout, but short workbench.

Interesting tray
Interesting tray

An interesting tool tote/tray that holds the tools off the ground for easier access.

Shur Stop Glass Ball Fire Extinguishers
Shur Stop Glass Ball Fire Extinguishers

Neat antique fire extinguisher grenades by ‘Shur Stop’. I never saw a full technician’s case of them before along with several of the holders for them. If they were exposed to enough heat the hammer would spring like a mouse trap, smash the glass causing a violent chemical reaction that would remove oxygen from the area and hopefully put out the fire. We’ll often see these over old boilers or up in the attics of old homes.

Full Case of Shur Stop Glass Ball Fire Extinguishers
Full Case of Shur Stop Glass Ball Fire Extinguishers

Apparently you could also throw them at the base of a flame — giving them the nickname: ‘Fire Extinguisher Grenade’

1897 Folding Sawing Machine
1897 Folding Sawing Machine

If you are living in the 1890s and want to use a 2 man saw to fell a large tree and don’t have any friends willing to help, you should check out this ‘Folding Sawing Machine’ from 1897.  It helps hold the saw perpendicular to the tree and allows you to use a lever to push and pull the saw.

1897 Folding Sawing Machine
1897 Folding Sawing Machine

 

Shave Horse aka Schnitzelbank
Shave Horse aka Schnitzelbank

A nice oak shave horse or schnitzelbank It was made from heavy oak, pegged and secured with cut nails.

Small Traveling Tool Chest
Small Traveling Tool Chest

 

Pair of tool chests
Pair of tool chests

 

Metal Tool Cabinet
Metal Tool Cabinet

An interesting commercial tool cabinet made from metal with what looked like mediocre post WWII tools.

Machinist Tool Chest
Machinist Tool Chest

 

Saw till on lid closed. Lid back on tool tray in chest -- Nantucket Tool Chest
Saw till on lid closed. Lid back on tool tray in chest — Nantucket Tool Chest

While no Anarchist’s tool chests were to be found this year, this solid old chest, presumably from Nantucket given the huge painted label on the front. It looks like it was based on traditional designs, made in the 20th century but built a bit more like a modern carpenter with very simple joinery compared to a traditional joiner who more likely would have used dovetails, mortise and tenon etc.

Sliding Tool Trays or Tills -- Nantucket Tool Chest
Sliding Tool Trays or Tills — Nantucket Tool Chest

The till lid screws were stripped and was removed for the above photo. There were 3 layers of tills and at least one division on the bottom to divide the bottom compartment of the chest.

Saw Till -- Nantucket Tool Chest
Saw Till — Nantucket Tool Chest

Saw till was protected by a frame and panel that attempted to dress up the chest. The corners of the chest were reinforced with extra wood and hid the joinery, but I suspect the overlapping boards mean that the corners were potentially all nailed together which means this chest was likely built quickly.

Nantucket Tool Chest
Nantucket Tool Chest

The chest lifts were heavy cast lifts that looked of modest quality. It was interesting to see how the dust rim was screwed on.

 

My new treasures from the show this year
My new treasures from the show this year

This year I did well. I found all the odd items on my list and only a couple of extras.  I picked up a great double gear Miller’s Falls egg beater drill — recommended by Tom Fidgen and love it so far. Also got a nice set of Russel Jennings Pattern Auger bits, a nice Miller’s Falls push drill (just a novelty I wanted to try), and a few books. For my Sloyd related projects I found a real nice transitional jack plane, 2 foot folding rule, bit brace drivers, stanley square etc. As always I had a great time and I’m already looking forward to the September show.

(You can check out what happened last September here.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have Files, Will Sharpen

The bench planes and chisels are not the only tools that need regular sharpening…your handsaws will also benefit from a little TLC.

Below is a nice vintage saw sharpening vice I picked up years ago from a cabinetmaker in Newton who was retiring and moving south. It was in very good shape and had some very graceful lines in the casting, but the little vise screw was designed to only close up to about 1″ so I could never use it on my 3/4″ thick assembly table unless I wanted to shim it up with an extra block of wood. It now found its home on the edge of my sharpening station where it’s generally out of the way when I am sharpening on the stones.

Saw in Saw Vise
Saw in Saw Vise  (No, that Bachco saw for timber framing is not the most traditional saw for sharpening, but every now and then a quick touch up helps extend its life)

When looking for a saw sharpening vise, make sure you pick one where the inner jaw faces are smooth, the center of the jaws are open in the center when not under pressure — this way it evenly applies pressure when holding your saws — and has a solid clamping action both on the saw and onto the bench. If you cannot find one of these old vices, you can make your own jaws from wood and use it in your bench vise or check out the modern version of this vice from Gramercy Tools.

Space at center of the jaws
Space at center of the jaws

Now that you have a place to hold your saw, it’s time to start sharpening. I used to have a random assortment of files I bought from various machinist’s chests, flea markets and used tool dealers over the years and I got by with that.  The problem with that random assortment was if you wanted something just a little bigger or smaller or finer or at a different profile it was a lot of hunting around, I may not have what I was looking for and I do not believe all of them were necessarily meant for hand saw sharpening. Then a few weeks ago I saw Lee Valley started offering a Grobet Swiss files with a labeled tool roll and decided to give it a try. I’ve had other Grobet Swiss files in the past (for carving and similar applications) and been very happy with the quality.

Lee Valley Saw File Set + Tool Roll
Lee Valley Saw File Set + Tool Roll

So far it’s been a great little set and earned a place in my tool chest. I sprang for the ‘needle file’ which is used with very fine and progressive pitch saws and has a dedicated pocket in this tool roll. Online there are plenty of great articles on how to sharpen a saw so I won’t go into detail about how to do that here, but I will make a few high level suggestions. If you sharpen regularly and with a consistent motion you’ll likely have good results. If you have to joint and reset a saw, track down an old Stanley or similar saw set tool. I found an old one in the original box for < $10 and it looked almost new — these tools often do not see a ton of use, but when needed they work much better than the very old bending wrench style saw set.

Good luck and happy filing!

Don’t forget to pack your Molding Comb

 

 

 

 

As a preservation carpenter or cabinet maker a common task that comes up is replicating a molding you find out in the world. Unfortunately most historic sites, museums and stores will not let you pop off a piece of molding to directly trace its profile — no matter how politely you ask. That’s where the molding comb, a.k.a profile gauge, comes in handy. This seemingly simple tool works by pressing it up against the molding you want to capture, and pressing the little feelers against the pieces so they take on the shape of what it’s pressed against. This works much the same way as a common desktop toy from the 1980s with a ton of metal pins held in a grid that can capture whatever you press into it. Once you have the profile you can take the gauge and trace it onto paper thus transferring the profile.  This tool also works well for wood turners.

When it came time for me to try and find my own molding combs, I was surprised by how few are even on the market, let alone quality versions. As a kid I remember playing with some versions of this tool made from a series of metal pins, they were often very stiff to use and once a pin got bent, rusty or lost the tool usually became very hard to use. When looking for one of these tools you’ll want to seek out a model that has pins or blades that move smoothly but are kept under sufficient tension to retain the shape you are tracing. You also want to have the finest/thinnest blades you can find as the higher resolution will result in smoother curves. Some of the cheap import models yield results that look like an old 8-bit video game with jagged edges. 

 

The best ones I could find on the market today I bought from GarrettWade.com, and you will pay a premium to get a quality tool you may not use everyday, but I believe the much higher quality results are worth the extra expense in this case. Pictured above are all 3 sizes they offer, and coming from Europe they are in metric sizes roughly on the order of 6″, 12″ and 18″. What I like about them is the fairly fine granularity of the blades, the nice amount of tension on the blades which hold a profile well, and the way one side is triangular and one side is round making it easier to get into odd places. For exterior work the plastic surfaces will not rust which comes in handy when working out in the weather.

Anarchy at the Tool Show — Classic Tool Chests

I need to get something off my chest– literally. Ever since reading the Anarchist’s Tool Chest I’ve had Tool Chest envy. My wife and I recently moved up to NH from Boston and it seems like it has been taking a lifetime to get my shop setup and fully functional again. Teaching, work, life, smaller projects and commissions keep getting in the way. Once winter sets in and I get more ‘me’ time in the shop I plan to build my own proper tool chest — though right now hand my tools ride around in style via a mobile tool chest/cart I built as a student at NBSS — complete with curved fenders, a retractable handle, 4 drawers and a tray top  (I’ll post more on that in an upcoming post).

This past week I was at the Live Free or Die tool show and auction in Nashua NH — and is part of my twice annual pilgrimage to the ultimate old hand tool show. Beyond great deals on hard to find tools, it’s also a great place to see lots of faces from NBSS, vendors I’ve been buying from for years and the one random guy who only seems to sell very ornate turned plumb bobs every year.

Below are some of the more interesting tool chests I was able to find and photograph with my camera phone (please excuse the quality of them).  The wide variety of what survived was a great source of inspiration.

 

You can learn more about the Anarchist’s Tool Chest here on my friend Chris Schwarz’s blog. (Along with other great books by the Lost Art Press)

Sorry Chris — I was unable to find any slant topped chests, but I gave it a good try.

Hand Tool Luggage — A Better Saw Till

How often have you seen saws just tossed in with other tools in a box or bucket? For how much money you spend on a good quality saw and for the results you expect out of it there is no excuse for abusing the saw in transit. A saw banging around in a tool box can get bent, dull, have the set of the teeth get out of alignment etc.  Described below is how I solved this problem for my saws in the shop and out on the job site.

Saw Till with Handle and Safety Strap
Saw Till with Handle and Safety Strap

The traditional way a saw was transported around was in a saw till. They often took on many forms — sometimes as part of a larger tool chest, attached to the inside of the lid of a larger tool box, as a stationary wall cubby or cabinet or as its own portable unit. For me the portable unit was a great place to start. I made a pair of tills that are shown in the photos below.

Saw Till Construction Detail
Saw Till Construction Detail

The carcass of my saw till is similar to one we used at NBSS. It’s made of 1/2″ plywood sides, 3/4″ plywood top, 1/4″ plywood dividers. I took it further by sanding, rounding the corners and finishing it with Shellac and Wax. The real improvements I made were the addition of a carry handle and safety strap. The strap is nylon like you would use on a backpack — I used my sewing machine to sew returns on the straps, attached them to the side of the till with button studs and used a nice plastic clasp to connect the two sides. This strap is pulled through the open D handles on the saws and keeps them from falling out. The plastic clasp allows you to change the size of the strap as your arsenal of saws changes over time and allows for quick access. When mounting the handle do your best to locate it in such a way that it balances nicely when loaded up with saws — it will be easier on your wrists and will keep the saws where they belong.

Saw Till In Its Natural Setting
Saw Till In Its Natural Setting

This is a great weekend shop project and I hope you will consider building one. The size and shape of the sides should be dictated by the largest saw you plan to put in your till. If you do build your own, please do share your pics or posts with me and we can link them to this post.

Curly Cherry Table Top with Domino XL

Beyond basic mortise and tenon joinery/carcass construction the Festool Domino XL also has potential to replace my biscuit joiner.

I’ve been working on a curly cherry shaker console table for our dining room and wanted to see how well the indexing fence would work in gluing up a table top. The first step was milling the wood and laying it out to get the best grain patterns.From there I marked out where I wanted the dominoes — being careful to make sure when the top is cut to final size no domino would be exposed. I also marked the center lines on blue tape to save with later cleanup.

TIP: set the tape back from the edge — otherwise you run the risk of having blue tape forever captured in your joint and ruining the appearance of the top.

I started off working the same way I would with a biscuit joiner — using the center line as my guide. Things moved along well and with the dust collector attached the machine left nice clean holes. On the second joint I used the indexing fence to speed up production. The key to using this fence well is making sure that you have BOTH fences set exactly the same and doing a test cut on scrap wood — this way you can be sure your joints line up the way you want.  The first time using this method I did the same measuring and tape technique to gauge if I was drifting at all. If you are diligent in applying pressure so that your indexing pin is firmly in place you’ll be amazed with the result.If you are worried about the drift, you can set the machine to cut wider mortises and give some wiggle room like you have with biscuits. (I would recommend this technique for very long table tops — the more dominos you use in a row the more chance you have of making an error — but when going this route you have to be mindful of how your wider mortises can affect where the next mortise is set and lead you to drift off from where you expect as the extra room adds up — so use it with caution and/or mark things out as I have done above)

In an upcoming post I will cover using the domino to construct the carcase to support this table top — wherein the skirt boards were all made from a single piece of wood and provides a continuous grain pattern across the piece including the drawer fronts. Stay tuned.

 

 

 

 

New life for an old DeWalt Radial Arm Saw

A few years ago I inherited my grandfather’s old radial arm saw (RAS). Pop-pop (as I called him) passed away in 2004 and the tool sat in my mother’s garage until In finally got settled into place with enough room for more stationary equipment. My grandparents lived about 5 minutes away from my parents house and it was more or less like having a second set of parents. As a child I spent a ton of time helping my grandfather around the house with various projects. I’m an only child, and my mother was an only child, so I think I was the closest to Pop-pop, especially for guy stuff. I grew up watching old westerns and action movies with him, hanging out and working on models, trains etc.

So in 2007/2008 I moved the machine up from NY into my shop in MA and started the restoration process. It’s not the biggest model radial arm saw, but it was a solid model, very well intact and was a labor of love more than anything. It’s not a tool a use every day, but for the times I do use it (like repeated dadoes), its very good at what it does.

Restored unit with new Mr. SawDust table in pace
Restored unit with new Mr. SawDust table in pace

Here is a view of the completed machine complete with heavy duty ‘Mr. Sawdust’ table.  If you ever do restore an old DeWalt Radial Arm saw I highly recommend the ‘Mr. Sawdust’ book as it was a great resource both on the history of the tool, how to tune it up, and how to build the Mr Sawdust table which really addresses the biggest shortcoming RAS’s had (giving you a much bigger and more stable work surface that will not deflect under load). It’s all shined up, cutting true, new blade, new base, new table and looking and running as good or better than new.

My grandfather was not always very neat and tidy in the garage/workshop and I thought it was interesting how I found the machine with all the accessories and original manuals stacked up on the table which was odd to me since I knew the machine had not been used in years and they had moved since it was last used. When I related this to my Dad he pointed out that it clearly must have been my grandfather putting it all together for me to have which was really emotional for me when I realized he was right. The happy ending is now that the machine is all restored and tuned up, it’s a bit like having Pop-pop in the shop with me.

Below is a slideshow covering the restoration process with more details in the photo captions.

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